Technology

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Instagram’s Bieber problem

As for Krieger, he still remembers Bieber’s digital ID in the database that underpinned Instagram—6860189—because Bieber’s account was so often the source the latest problem. “I still know it by heart” Krieger says. “So many of the early scaling issues had to do with him hitting things we’d never hit before, so I got good at knowing it was him just by sighting his ID.”

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The Kaomoji are coming? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Kaomoji are, of course, Japanese-style emoticons, first imported to U.S. internet shores by anime forum posters. Why use kaomoji? They’re more elaborate and more expressive — and also more practical: You don’t need to tilt your head to the side to read them.

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Jeep. History.

The Jeep was made for war. In 1940, the impending U.S. involvement in World War II pushed the army to call for a new vehicle suited for battle. And so the Jeep, a works-in-progress vehicle, constantly evolving on its open patent, tailoring to changing demands of conflict, was born—and then shipped off to war.

More blurry is its etymology. Jeep legend is seeped in heavily contested mythologies, but one roots the name in a slurring of GP, or General Purpose, which may have been the original name of the military-design vehicle.

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Waze helps beat you beat traffic and annoy residents

Ms. Menard’s suburban Los Angeles street of ranch houses, Cody Road, has turned into a thoroughfare with enough gridlock to make Times Square at rush hour feel tranquil. On early mornings when headlights are still needed, it resembles one long funeral procession.

The culprit: Waze, the popular app owned by Alphabet Inc.’s Google that provides alternate routes to busy boulevards and packed freeways. Launched in 2007, Waze has 50 million users world-wide and about two million in Los Angeles, its biggest U.S. market.

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